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Why did the school do nothing about Dolphus Jaeger? Why did the parents do nothing about their injured children? There was only one reason: all evidence disappeared by the end of each class. The children’s injuries, the recordings—if they even ever existed, that is. At times, it seemed like even the children’s memories of all the supernatural incidents had vanished.

All, that is, except Mitsu, Allyce, and Hazen. These three remembered particularly well, not having forgotten even one single detail.

One day, when the three were sitting on the plains behind Hazen’s home, they whispered to each other about the incident.

“We can’t go on like this!” Allyce whined, frowning.

Mitsu agreed. “Mr…is scary.” Scary enough that she didn’t even dare say his name.

“My parents won’t let me move to another school,” Hazen said. “They said I’m imagining things. What about yours?”

The girls nodded. It was the same for them too, although Mitsu did add, “They kind of considered it.”

“What should we do?” Allyce asked, looking at Hazen. Mitsu followed her gaze.

“I don’t know if you’ll believe me,” Hazen told them, presenting a jar of orange liquid. “But the other day, I found this in my room. It came with a note.” He retrieved the note from his pocket, and handed it to Allyce, who read it aloud.

“’Poison to kill your teacher with’.”

Mitsu gasped, raising a tiny hand to her lips. “Kill?”

“Are you sure?” Hazen asked as well.

“I’m sure I know my alphabet,” Allyce defended, somewhat put off by their disbelief, even though she understood that they weren’t exactly doubting her ability to read.

“That’s what we’ll do, then,” Hazen concluded, as easily as if he was deciding to get a scoop of ice cream.

The day came when Mr. Jaeger joined other teachers for lunch. As usual, he left his mug of coffee right there on the teacher’s desk, knowing no one would dare touch it. He was right on most days, but this wasn’t one of them.

Hazen, being the only boy of the three, was to do the dirty work. He slipped back into the classroom while other kids played outside, with Allyce and Mitsu guarding the door. Carefully, the boy opened the jar, and poured its contents into the mug. He watched the mixed liquids for a minute, half-expecting something to pop out, or the coffee to sizzle, or the whole mug to explode and burn his face—or, at the very least, a disgusting odor to be released. Yet, none of that happened. The mug of coffee looked nothing less, and nothing more, than simply a mug of coffee, and so Hazen left the classroom again, the now-empty jar in his pocket. He nodded at Mitsu and Allyce, who then joined the rest of the children on the playground, temporarily forgetting the crime they had just attempted to commit.

The rest of the day proceeded as it normally would, as normally as Mr. Jaeger allowed it to. The teacher did drink from his mug, but nothing seemed to be happening.

The next day, though, a substitute teacher walked into the classroom.

“Children,” the male teacher said, “Your former teacher, Mr. Dolphus Jaeger, passed away last night due to a heart failure.” The young man paused for a moment to see the kids’ reaction. Not getting any response whatsoever, he continued speaking. “So…I will be teaching you until a new teacher arrives. You don’t need to call me ‘mister’ anything. Just call me Bloise.”

Mitsu failed to notice the look of recognition on Hazen’s face, but even if she didn’t, it would make no difference—that night, after meeting Bloise for the first time, Mitsu developed a high fever, which made her spend a few days at home. When she woke again, she had no recollection of her two best friends, and no recognition of a gray-haired man in his fifties who called himself Dolphus Jaeger. She did recall a pair of sharp green eyes, but not to whom they belonged.

It was after that amnesiac fever that Mitsu’s family decided to move.

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